University Culture Makes Students Pick Between Feelings and Education

From the public square to post-secondary classrooms, students are told to censor “controversial topics” by professors and departments, evaluated based on peer reaction

Guest post by Valerie Flokstra
Abbotsford, BC

My first public speaking class is a day that remains clearly fixed in my memory.

The professor warned us that she intended to do her best to scare away anyone who wasn’t serious about the course. Her expectations were high, but rather than becoming nervous, I grinned. The greater the challenge, the more I would learn.

As I left that first class, my head reeled with speech topic ideas and possibilities. There were so many things I could speak on. Then suddenly my feet came to halt in the middle of the hallway. Pro-life. I could tell the class something about the pro-life message. My insides turned to Jell-O. What if the class hated me for it? What if the prof failed me for that speech?

A few weeks later, I attended my first NCLN Symposium. For four years, I’ve been involved with UFV’s pro-life Club, Lifelink, and sometimes it was a pretty discouraging job. The Symposium gave me so many new tools for spreading the pro-life message effectively. I flew back to British Columbia feeling confident and fired up with ambition to fight for the preborn. My mind was made up. A class grade was not as important as a life. It was not as important as honouring God.

That was how on Monday, November 21, I ended up standing inside my professor’s office, my heart pounding against my rib cage as I clutched my binder of notes.

“Hello,” I said, plastering a smile onto my face, “I wanted to talk to you because I am doing my speech on a controversial topic. I would like your advice on how to present it as effectively as possible.”

A pair of raised eyebrows. “Which topic?”

“Abortion.”

A pause. “I would not recommend that. I have never seen it done well. Can you do a different topic?”

I clung to my confidence, refusing to let it slip away. “No. I did well on my first two speeches. I researched for over twelve hours to get unbiased sources for this one. I am going to do this speech, but I ask that you help me to present it well.”

A deep breath, this time from my professor. “Have a seat.”

Forty-five minutes later, I was back in the hallway, shaking but smiling. I’d done it. My professor was impressed with my research. A few of my points were crossed out, others had notes added, and my speech was ready for final polishing.

An hour later my tenuous confidence shattered. I opened my inbox to find an email from my professor. The gist of it (in far more words than I remember) was that I couldn’t do my pro-life speech after all, based on a discussion she had with the department head.

I was shaking. Whatever happened to universities being places for freedom of speech?

My speech was in two days, and NCLN was on it right away. My campus coordinator, Joanna, immediately sent me documents about my university’s freedom of speech policies. She also assured me that NCLN was ready and able to help me, and so was a lawyer if necessary. Joanna also assured me she was praying for me. Knowing I was not alone made all the difference.

The next day, I received a response from my professor. She’d spoken with the department head again, and I could do my speech. However, the department imposed four requirements:

  1. Warn the class about anything graphic I would be showing or telling.
  2. Tell the class they are welcome to leave, and then pause to give them time to do so.
  3. Tell those who stay that the university offers free counseling in case they felt it was needed after hearing my speech.
  4. Explain to the class that I would be telling the speech in an objective (unemotional/unbiased) manner.

Yikes. The class would probably think that I was going to traumatize them before I even had a chance to speak my own words. What if they all left and I had to give my speech to an empty room?

I was less afraid of getting a bad mark than hurting my fellow students. I never bonded so much with my entire class as I had with that public speaking class. But, who knows? Maybe my presentation would help one of them in the future. Maybe the truth would save a life.

As I commenced my speech, I forced myself to make eye contact with every one of my peers. My challenge to the class was that they think about the information I presented and make an informed opinion about abortion. “Choice” isn’t really a choice if the decision is not an informed one. With nearly 100,000 abortions annually, or about 1 in 3 pregnancies ending in abortion here in Canada [link], this is an issue that affects us immensely.

When the speech was over, the professor ended the class, and a few students came up to me and told me I’d done a good job on my speech. I asked my professor for feedback. “You did a good job,” she said. “But,” she added, “part of delivering an effective speech involves the audience’s reaction. Half the class appeared to be shut down. Some of them were almost laughing with embarrassment and disbelief that anyone would talk about this in public. Your mark won’t be as high for this speech as it was for your first two.”

With confidence I responded: “When I’m sixty years old, I won’t care that I got a lower mark. But if I didn’t do this speech, I would regret that I could have helped someone but didn’t.” The professor shrugged.

I politely said goodbye and left the classroom. Looking back, I’m not sure that comment was the best one to make. What I am sure of is that twenty-five more people have heard how abortion is an injustice. And that definitely counts for something.


Valerie is a 2017 graduate of the University of Fraser Valley, finishing her degree in Chemistry and Physics.
We at NCLN thank her for her courage to speak on behalf of pre-born children with her peers!
To find more about this year’s NCLN Symposium, click here

For information on the research Valerie used for her speech, contact val95@live.com and/or see http://hushfilm.com/.

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Effective Time Management = Effective Activism. #Truth

Effective Time Management = Effective Activism. #Truth

Everything that we do as anti-abortion activists has to be ordered towards one thing: saving babies.
However, if there is one thing I’ve learned as a former campus prezzy it’s that if you don’t manage time your time well you won’t be able to affect your campus, you won’t be able to save babies and you definitely won’t be able to function as an activist human being…

You have a lot going on. You have papers to write, classes to attend, eating to do, Facebook to browse, SnapChat to peak at. You’re busy, we get it. So act like it. Tell your time where its supposed to go. It is well within your control to do so.

You won’t function well as a human being (you are still human…)

#TruthTalk, you guys. When I was a campus pro-life prezzy, I was pretty terrible at managing my time. Often, on the days that we did activism I was so busy that I wouldn’t eat for most of the day. I would end up eating breakfast at like… 4 pm. Shockingly, not eating for a whole day is bad for you.

Our activism would often be planned somewhat last minute (I mean sometimes you have to do that when.. certain kinds of meetings or events take place that #ShallNotBeNamed that you suddenly found out about and must gather the troops to be at…) . Sometimes, we would just decide the night before or the week before what we were doing.

Looking back, I see how this greatly limited the growth of our team and how this exemplified poor leadership on my part. I was not respectful of my team’s time and as a result we had few members who were invested in our club , and it actually exponentially increased my workload causing me to be more stressed more often.

This led me to burn out for a period of time in my 3rd year. I needed to take off a whole semester from regular campus activism because, to be brutally honest, I was too disorganized to even manage my time!

I thought I didn’t need to manage my time in order to have effective activism. I thought that the activism was effective enough and if someone was bought in enough they would show up no matter what.

The reality is that a very small percentage of people operate like that. If you do as a campus leader, it’s because you are bought in – and I get it. . For most people, activism is something they have to learn how to do.  And in order to learn how to do it, they need to be given strong, organized and respectful opportunities to do it.

If you burn out, you won’t be able to do activism very well for very long. It’s that simple.

If you choose the ‘convenience’ of being able to do activism whenever you would like at the expense of a strong team, you are creating barriers between your campus and hearing the pro-life message effectively, and regularly… And that is on you. You won’t be able to affect your campus as well as you would like…

If you don’t choose to manage your time, your activism will be sporadic. Sporadic activism usually means disorganized activism, miscommunication, and more stress. And let’s be honest, doing activism at the last minute on a regular basis usually results in just doing activism less often.

You won’t save as many lives…

Why? Because you just won’t be around as much.

Let’s break it down:

if you aren’t there sharing the pro-life perspective, your peers will not be challenged.
if you aren’t there, making yourself available, your peers will not be challenged.
if you aren’t there, with a sharp mind and open heart, your peers will not be challenged.
And they will be more likely to choose abortion. #TruthBomb

Recently, at Simon Fraser University (Burnaby), the pro-life students were doing the QA (Question Abortion) Project. They talked to a student for a while about abortion. Before he left he said, “ Thanks for being here. I’m on my way actually talk to my friend and her boyfriend about their new pregnancy. Now I know what I’m going to say.”

Wow. powerful.

Here are some tools to help you become a better, more timely and more effective activist and human being:

TeamViewer for online presentations: https://www.teamviewer.com/en/use-cases/meetings-and-collaboration/

Boomerang #Trickster #ThereAreTwo
For capturing activism into a GIF: http://simplymeasured.com/blog/why-boomerang-what-this-app-really-means-for-social-marketers/#sm.00000lqc1p6z5dxluj92azwx94vr8
For managing club emails: http://www.boomerangapp.com/

Doodle:
For scheduling activism efficiently: http://doodle.com/

Google Calendar:
For making sure you all know when they activism or meeting is happening: http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/google-in-the-enterprise/six-tips-to-manage-your-google-calendar-more-efficiently/

Google Hangouts
To communicate with your team wherever they are! http://www.wikihow.com/Use-Google%2B-Hangouts
(SIDENOTE: if you have a few minutes, also type “How to use google hangouts” into Youtube for some excellent entertainment)

Google Forms
To create important surveys for activism (but also pizza preferences) https://www.google.ca/forms/about/

Ultimately even using these tools requires you to make the commitment to manage your time better for your sake, the team’s sake and of course, on behalf of the babies.

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The Road Ahead: Reflections from Symposium 2014

One life changed, many lives saved. We are so excited to share with you Alex’s story of finding her passion—and now career—in helping preborn babies and pregnant moms. Alex Sibiga, outgoing co-president of U of G LifeChoice, attended her first NCLN Symposium in 2014 and wrote a blog for her club’s website about the impact that the weekend had on her. Two years later, her desire to help preborn children and pregnant women continues to fuel her: she is currently doing her second summer internship with the Canadian Centre for Bioethical Reform, and in the fall will begin the midwifery program at McMaster University. In her words, “That Symposium changed my life. I’m so glad to look back knowing that the conviction I felt didn’t extinguish.” We’re so glad as well!

Check out her reflections after attending Symposium 2014: True Patriot Love.

The Road Ahead

You must never be fearful about what you are doing when it is right. – Rosa Parks

A little over a week ago, I spent a weekend in a place that seemed too good to be true, a made-up land perhaps…Actually, as more time passes, the more I feel as though I did just dream up the whole thing.

This Oz that I am talking about is the NCLN Symposium — a pro-life conference, put on by pro-life power-houses, to train and equip members of pro-life clubs on university campuses all across Canada. This was a place where everyone around was, in fact, pro-life and shared the belief that abortion is wrong.

Woah, right?

It was such a great and unusual experience being surrounded by people who feel the same way as I do about abortion and have the same passion as I do to end it. I was in a place where I could openly share how sad I am for the pain abortion causes women, or how angry I am at abortion clinics and their coercive ways used to make ridiculous profit, or how frustrated I am at our culture’s double standard when it comes to human rights. I could share these views openly and everyone agreed and shared similar opinions! Seriously, not used to that.

Being a pro-lifer at a university such as Guelph’s, I’ve gotten pretty accustomed to being part of the minority who thinks the littlest of us should have the right to live and that the best solution for an unplanned pregnancy ISN’T to “undo” it. I am pretty aware that this isn’t the general consensus at school. With not a single pregnant student in sight and a Planned Parenthood ad in the section of our survival guides that’s supposed to tell us where to go if pregnant, it seems the culture around me is more pro-abortion than anything…

So as you could imagine, it was a breath of fresh air being at this symposium. I wasn’t in Kansas— I mean Guelph, anymore, and a big part of me wanted to stay there forever. That would be counter-productive though… If you want to change the world, you can’t only surround yourself with people who agree with you. So now we’re back to school, but I’ve taken a lot from the weekend with me, and I hope to hang on to all I’ve learned like a life vest in this stormy pro-abortion sea!

There are three specific things that struck me:

We are human rights activists. There’s a significant group in our population who do not have the rights that they deserve, that we all deserve- the right to live, and this is no different from the other major human rights violations in the past. When some people were considered slaves, it was perfectly legal to deny them their rights to freedom. The law said these humans were not persons. Many people accepted that this was how their society had to run. But then there were those few loud and bold individuals who stood up for them. Those human rights activists took on the struggle and fought the unconquerable battle until it was conquered. It’s no different now. We are human rights activists fighting for what will one day end, and when our grandchildren live in a world where, like slavery now, abortion is unthinkable, and they ask us if we did anything about it, we won’t have to be ashamed about our indifference or our silence.

Being Pro-life is an action. I’ve always thought abortion was wrong, but sometimes I just didn’t think about it, and sometimes I felt like it was just too big of an issue for me to be able to do anything…so I didn’t do anything. I justified this by telling myself that I know it’s wrong, I would never have one, and that’s as far as being pro-life needs to go. What’s wrong with this picture is that being an inactive pro-lifer is believing abortion is killing human beings but letting it go on! I know it’s a huge battle to fight, but we’re 100% sure to lose if we fight with apathy and inaction. The Pro-Life Movement is gaining momentum and everyone has something to offer it! We need social media masterminds, prayer warriors, convincing conversationalists, generous funders, maternal support super heroes, and SO much more. Preborn infants can’t speak or act. But we can. And we must.

Finally, Be courageous and have hope, change is ACTUALLY possible. The biggest thing I got out of the weekend was
HOPE. It’s so easy to get discouraged and think that no one will ever change their mind about abortion, but I learned that hearts and minds are being changed across Canada. Through logical, loving, and honest dialogue many people are realizing the injustice. The CCBR, or Canadian Centre for Bioethical Reform, is an incredible and gutsy organization that goes out to the streets with the very real images of abortion victims. As alarming as that sounds, a lot of people take those images to heart. Of course people get angry at the display, but then they talk with the CCBR members and come to the conclusion that abortion is in fact taking the life of a person. These conversations aren’t heated debates, like so many of our discussions about abortion end up being; these conversations are rooted in love for all life, and THAT is what changes things. I know this yellow brick road that pro-lifers have to walk is not an easy one, but take courage and love those who are pro-choice, because it’s that courage and that love which WILL change hearts and save lives.

I’m writing all of this not just for you to read and hopefully be inspired, but for myself also. I feel as though the fire I have for this cause is blazing and ready to take on the world, but I know being at university is like placing this fire in a blizzard. This battle is so incredibly tough. Discouragement and apathy are sure to take a swing at me this year, but when they do, I hope to read this and remember that we can’t stop because we’re tired, or because it’s hard. We can only stop on the day every heart and mind believes the truth, and the land of Oz— the land that respects all human life— won’t be somewhere over the rainbow, but right here at home.

And there’s no place like home.

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Students at Brandon University Sue their Student Union after Club Banned from Campus

 

Brandon, MB: Pro-life students at Brandon University have filed a lawsuit after having their club status withdrawn by their student union in November without warning. The Brandon University Student Union alleged that the pro-life stance made some students feel “uncomfortable” and “intimidated” them. The union also argued that the club’s beliefs were contrary to the Canadian Federation of Students’ official pro-choice stance, and that the club itself was redundant because other campus groups (the LGBTQ Collective and the Women’s Collective) addressed the issue of abortion.

The club is not unfamiliar with censorship, as this is not the first time they have had to resort to legal aid in order to regain their official club status. “Our student union claims to serve students and support them in their efforts to share their passions and advocate for various causes,” states Catherine Dubois, president of Brandon University Students for Life, “However, over the past 4 years our club has been repeatedly censored and denied these opportunities offered to every other student. We are tired and frustrated with being treated in such a discriminatory manner.”

“It is unacceptable that a student on a university campus should have to resort to a court challenge to ensure they can enjoy the same freedoms as their peers on campus,” states Anastasia Pearse, Executive Director of National Campus Life Network, an organization dedicated to supporting post-secondary pro-life students, “It is disconcerting that campuses in our country are choosing to censor controversial issues rather than allow for open dialogue and debate.”

Currently, four other lawsuits initiated by pro-life student clubs are working their way through courts across the country. This is the highest number of lawsuits regarding campus free speech issues to be filed by pro-life clubs within a one-year period. The other universities include Ryerson University, the University of Toronto Mississauga, the University of Ontario Institute of Technology, and the University of Alberta.

“Abortion is an issue that personally affects women of the university age,” states Pearse, “we believe that women deserve to know everything about this procedure, even if the information makes people feel uncomfortable. Universities should not be afraid to accommodate opposing views on important and even controversial issues. With over 250 abortions occurring every day in Canada, this is a conversation that students ought to be having.”

For further information:

Anastasia Pearse
Executive Director, National Campus Life Network
director@ncln.ca
604-365-3484

Catherine Dubois, Brandon University Students for Life
204-570-1710 or duboiscm52@brandonu.ca

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2015 Fall Brandon Chalking_4

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Regret an abortion? You don’t have to be silent

Written by Denae Pellerin from University of Saskatchewan Students for Life

This post original appeared in their student newspaper, The Sheaf. Go to this link and show your support for Denae by responding to the poll at the bottom of the article!

In the midst of the “Shout Your Abortion” campaign, more attention is being drawn to women who don’t regret having an abortion. However, women should be free to talk about abortion, regardless of how they feel about it.

The hashtag #ShoutYourAbortion has recently been trending in response to a motion by the United States Congress to defund Planned Parenthood for one year in order to perform a thorough investigation of its services.

The bill was proposed due to ethical concerns raised in reaction to undercover footage, collected and released by the Centre for Medical Progress, showing Planned Parenthood directors and executives bargaining over the organs and bodies of aborted human fetuses.

“Shout Your Abortion” began with the intent of letting women speak about their relief and happiness in choosing abortion, while simultaneously supporting and defending Planned Parenthood, the United States’ largest abortion provider.

There is plenty of controversy surrounding the allegations against Planned Parenthood as well as the overall moral topic of abortion. However, in the middle of all the political activism and shouting, I cannot help but think of women who do not want to shout their abortions — women who regret their abortions.

The Sexual Health Centre in Saskatoon, previously Planned Parenthood Saskatoon, claims that abortion is less invasive than having one’s tonsils removed — so why would women be upset?

Even if the numbers are small, there are still women who experience pain, regret and guilt due to having had an abortion. Regardless of where you stand on the issue, we can all agree that a woman who regrets her abortion should not have to suffer in silence.

Her experience and feelings are real and they are not a mistake. Just as choosing an abortion can be complicated, the feelings after an abortion can be complicated as well. All women should be invited to speak about their abortion experience without fear.

Women in Canada already have begun to take initiatives to offer freedom to those suffering in silence after an abortion. Beginning in November of 2002, the Silent No More Awareness campaign began in the United States and has since spread to many other countries, including Canada.

Organized by women who have had abortions, they share their stories of confusion, relief, happiness and pain in an effort to reach out to those involved in abortions and in need of healing and empowerment. Their presence alone tells us it is okay to regret an abortion and that there is help.

Containing a wealth of resources, Silent No More is able to direct women to places near to them where they can receive assistance. According to the Canadian Institute for Health Information, approximately 38,350 abortions were experienced by women under the age of 29 in 2010.

IMG_5381
Students and NCLN staff with members of the Silent No More Awareness Campaign who publicly shared their abortion testimonies at UBC.

Many of our classmates have likely had personal experiences with abortions and should be granted the freedom to share or hold various opinions and stories. University is a time in our lives when we are encouraged to explore all sides of an issue and determine for ourselves what we will do.

However, as debates go on, we must not forget the people behind these issues. When only one idea or message is accepted on campus, we risk hurting those who do not conform to that idea. It’s important that women who regret their abortions are given the opportunity to be listened to without fear of being judged or labeled negatively.

Every woman is important and must be respected, whether or not her emotions promote a particular political stance. If you or a loved one is in need of care, do not hesitate to ask for help. You do not have to be silent — but you also don’t have to shout.

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ANTI-ABORTION GROUP AT RYERSON FILES LAWSUIT OVER ILLEGAL DISCRIMINATION

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

ANTI-ABORTION GROUP AT RYERSON FILES LAWSUIT OVER ILLEGAL DISCRIMINATION

Support-Ryerson-banner-1024x379

October 14, 2015. TORONTO, ON— Pro-life students at Ryerson University have filed a lawsuit against the Ryerson Students’ Union (RSU) over denying their club, Students for Life at Ryerson (SFLR), status.

On February 23rd, 2015, the RSU Board of Directors unanimously voted that SFLR would not be allowed to form a pro-life club. This vote marked the last step in an appeal process that began in the fall semester after SFLR was rejected by the Student Groups Committee on the basis that the RSU, “opposes…groups, meetings, or events that promote misogynist views towards woman [sic] and ideologies that promote gender inequity, challenges women’s right [sic] to bodily autonomy, or justifies [sic] sexual assault”.

“Our club stands for human rights for all human beings, including those at the earliest stages of life. We also want to support pregnant students on campus who want alternatives to abortion,” states Carter Grant, a third year business major and Vice-President of SFLR.

Pro-life students at Ryerson were first denied club status back in 2003.  Now students are taking the decision to court to assert their right to be treated fairly by their student union, and to not be discriminated against on the basis of their pro-life viewpoint.

What is happening at Ryerson is not an isolated event.  Pro-life students across the country have faced similar censorship at other institutions, including at the University of Victoria, University of Calgary, York University, Carleton University, Trent University, Lakehead University, and Capilano College.

As a strong advocate for freedom of expression, the Canadian Centre for Bio-Ethical Reform (CCBR) strongly opposes these acts of discrimination and is assisting the students with this case.  CCBR’s new legal department, CCBR Legal, has retained experienced constitutional lawyer Carol Crosson to defend the students.  Ms. Crosson says that, “pro-life students have been denied rights on campuses long enough.  This is the time to end this battle and enshrine students’ rights on campus.”

Through CCBR Legal, CCBR provides legal representation for those in the pro-life movement.  As history as shown, legal representation is an integral part of successful social movements.  The law protects the right for pro-life individuals to share their message on the same basis as others and CCBR Legal is determined to protect this right.

For more information, please contact Carol Crosson at 403-796-8110 or ccrosson@crossonlaw.ca, and Carter Grant at 647-213-4242 or carter.grant@ryerson.ca.

 

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UAlberta Pro-Life: Summer Activism!

This post was written for UAlberta Pro-Life by campusprolife. It does not necessarily represent the views of NCLN.

Happy summer, everyone! We’ve revamped the club website, and we have some exciting pro-life activism opportunities going on this summer. Our activism schedule will be less regular during the summer months, but if you are interested in receiving training in pro-life apologetics and/or in participating in one of our “Choice” Chain projects, please get in touch with us at prolife.ualberta@gmail.com, and we’ll let you know when something is happening in the Edmonton area.

Another way to stay engaged this summer is to attend The Wilberforce Project’s AGM in Spruce Grove, where renowned pro-life advocate Stephanie Gray will be speaking live. Registration is closing soon, so don’t delay if you’re interested in going!

If you are looking for other ways to get involved, or you are not in Edmonton area this summer, consider signing up at the No2Trudeau Campaign’s website to find out ways you can get involved with this nation-wide campaign to expose Justin Trudeau’s extreme stance on abortion. As someone who is personally involved with the campaign this summer, I highly recommend finding a way to support the work that is happening across Canada this summer. (We’re also happy to answer any questions you have about the campaign as well.)

Keep on fighting injustice, and hopefully we’ll see you when meetings resume in the fall!

– Amberlee

 


Read the comments at the UAlberta Pro-Life website.

I’m Sick of the March for Life

m4l march banner

Written by Rebecca Richmond

As long as you remember to wear sunscreen, the March for Life can be a lot of fun. At the National March we had gorgeous weather, great speakers, and a large turnout, and it all produced a contagious energy that gives you hope for the movement. Take a look at the smiling faces of the attendees and you can immediately tell that we are a people who love life, and we’re not afraid to share that with the nation and, in particular on that particular day, with our elected representatives.

But I’m sick of marching. I want to go to Ottawa every year to enjoy the tulips and have a reunion with my friends and colleagues. I enjoy the day, but the reality of why we march is sickening. The March is a protest, a public witness to politicians and to the country that there is a (taxpayer funded) human rights violation killing 100,000 Canadians every year.

I’m sick of the March because I’m sick of the injustice.

The March for Life and the dinners, EWTN TV specials and youth conferences that accompany it are only truly good in so far as they propel us back into our communities, our networks, our campuses. These one-day annual events are only truly impactful in so far as they serve as a springboard for local pro-life action that is regular, visible and engaging.

The point of a springboard is to help us reach new heights, but it only works if we choose to jump.

Tens of thousands marched at events across Canada last week, and that is good. And every year, people are impacted and inspired by the March to continue making a difference. That inspiration is a natural effect of the March. But we need to resolve to turn that inspiration into effective and regular action.

Because it’s not enough for tens of thousands to march. It’s not enough to have the largest gathering on Parliament Hill. It’s not enough until each one of the marchers become actively involved AND actively involve others.

What do I mean by actively involved? I don’t mean merely attending events. Attending pro-life events as a passive participant is insufficient; we need to be involved in the active mission of the movement.

1094735_10204669195348244_9006174920356542384_oAre we doing something – whether it’s from an educational, pastoral, cultural or political angle – that is changing hearts and minds and shifting the public consensus?

This action could be through organizations, through campaigns, through meetings and letters to your MP, through how you’re raising your family, through how you’re speaking up in conversations with coworkers and friends – the list goes on.

This is what is going to make our movement start to move. This is what builds a cultural juggernaut that obliterates the political talking points that (repeatedly) proclaim that the abortion debate is closed and/or that this is a woman’s right.

Our social movement is addressing an injustice that does more than discriminate or oppress Canadians – abortion kills.

angelaSo do our own lives and actions reinforce or undermine the pro-life message?

Do our commitments of time, energy and resources communicate to our communities that we are serious about the pro-life cause, that this is an injustice that needs to be addressed with urgency? Do we speak and act as though this issue – that of 300 pre-born children killed daily – is like any other charity…or do we treat it like the emergency it is?

If we aren’t living this way, if our pro-life commitment is largely based on one event a year, then no wonder our politicians don’t take us seriously. If we aren’t living this way, then our fellow Canadians won’t take us seriously either.

Social transformation requires us to have more than pro-life convictions, but also a pro-life lifestyle. And when tens of thousands of Canadians take up that lifestyle of active commitment, then we will hold captive the attention of politicians and, shortly thereafter, the March can become the celebration of a victory rather than the protest of an ongoing injustice.

For the sake of the lives we march for, we should all be sick of marching – but that shouldn’t discourage us. Instead, it should serve as a springboard into a lifestyle of committed action. Then, soon enough, we’ll be in Ottawa to admire the tulips rather than to protest an injustice.
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If you’d like to join our mailing list to receive updates on ways you can get actively involved in reaching campuses and Canadians this summer, send us an e-mail.

Not everyone can work full-time on the front lines of the movement, but you can support this necessary work. Click here to donate to NCLN, making it possible for us to continue reaching campuses and changing Canada. 

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