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uOttawa Students For Life: DefendGirls

This post was written for uOttawa Students For Life by uOttawa Students For Life. It does not necessarily represent the views of NCLN.

by Kate

DefendGirls is a new campaign to provide information and raise awareness about sex-selective abortion. I recommend taking a look at the DefendGirls Facebook page or at the website defendgirls.ca. The site offers information about the issue and about Motion 408, the motion recently filed in the House of Commons asking parliamentarians to condemn sex-selective abortions as discrimination against girls. The site also provides suggestions and links for further action and has a very interesting blog. DefendGirls stickers, postcards, business cards and t-shirts can be purchased through the NCLN website.

DefendGirls

 


Read the comments at the uOttawa Students For Life website.

uOttawa Students For Life: Abortion By The Numbers in Canada

This post was written for uOttawa Students For Life by uOttawa Students For Life. It does not necessarily represent the views of NCLN.

The National Post recently published a very informative and sobering infographic that breaks down the number of abortions that happened in Canada in 2009 by province and age of mother and child. (Note that the data underestimates the number of abortions because they’re not all reported.) What will you do to help decrease the number of preventable deaths where you live?

On a similar note, it was recently reported that 491 babies were born alive and left to die following botched abortions in Canada from 2000 to 2009. Have you emailed your MP?


Read the comments at the uOttawa Students For Life website.

uOttawa Students For Life: Call to Action on Assisted Suicide

This post was written for uOttawa Students For Life by uOttawa Students For Life. It does not necessarily represent the views of NCLN.

From NCLN:

Action Needed: BC Court Strikes Down Assisted-Suicide Ban

On Friday June 15th, the B.C. Supreme Court passed judgment on the Carter v. Canada Case. As Will Johnston, Chair of the Euthanasia Prevention Coalition of B.C., stated in a National Post opinion piece, the decision “purports to create constitutional immunity for those who provide assistance to those seeking to kill themselves — a judgment that stands at odds with the Supreme Court of Canada’s Rodriguez ruling in 1993. …. Current law will stand for at least a year (the sole exception being the plaintiff in this case, 64-year-old ALS patient Gloria Taylor)”.

Allowing euthanasia and assisted suicide in our country directly threatens the lives of people with disabilities as well other vulnerable people in our society, and opens up further avenues for elder abuse.

A recent press release from the Canadian Association for Community Living concerning the Carter case decision stated, “Our concern, therefore, is that rather than advancing equality rights for Canadians with disabilities, this ruling will have quite the opposite effect. We fear that by embedding in Canadian law the message that some forms of human life are less worth living, the historic disadvantages faced by Canadians with disabilities that the equality rights provisions of the Canadian Charter of Human Rights and Freedoms were to address, will only be more deeply entrenched.”

We need you to raise awareness about the harms of legalized euthanasia and assisted suicide:
Sign this petition to the Attorney General of Canada, requesting that he adopts the strongest possible opposition to the legalization of assisted suicide and euthanasia
Read these talking points provided by the Euthanasia Prevention Coalition, and send letters to your local media outlets outlining your opposition to the court’s ruling as it is a recipe for elder abuse, and creates a slippery slope which discriminates against people with disabilities and leaves them at risk
Contact the Justice Minister, the Honourable Robert Nicholson, asking him to stay the Carter decision and appeal it to the BC Court of Appeal
Become educated on this issue by checking out some of these articles and resources.

We hope you will do all you can to make your voice known in this matter. Our society has ultimately failed if our solution to problems is to eliminate the sufferer, rather than find measures to alleviate their suffering.

“What does it mean to give informed consent to one’s own death?
Is it meaningful to say that we can appreciate and understand the nature and consequences of that decision, when that decision means that we will no longer be here?
Isn’t autonomy about the right to non-interference, in the name of protecting one’s integrity, not undermining it?
Doesn’t the right to self-determination only find meaning because we wish to lay claim to our future?”
~Michael Bach, Executive Vice-President,
Canadian Association for Community Living

Also, check out the personal, thought-provoking piece by NCLN’s Executive Director, a uOSFL alumnus.


Read the comments at the uOttawa Students For Life website.

uOttawa Students For Life: Down Syndrome and Abortion

This post was written for uOttawa Students For Life by uOttawa Students For Life. It does not necessarily represent the views of NCLN.

by Elizabeth Tanguay

The latest fad these days in obstetrics is the Integrated Prenatal Screening test (IPS). Doctors may offer this screening, a combination of blood tests and nuchal translucency ultrasound, for neural tube defects and chromosomal anomalies to pregnant women over the age of 35. These tests can detect the probability of the fetus having spina bifida or Down syndrome. If the chance is greater than 1/200, the screen is considered positive and the parents are then offered further testing, such as chorionic villus sampling and amniocentesis, which carry a small risk to the fetus. After this, if the fetus is deemed to have Down syndrome, or trisomy 18 or trisomy 13, the obstetrician will offer the parents the option to terminate the pregnancy. There is no real prenatal cure or treatment for Down syndrome, or trisomy 18 or trisomy 13 or spina bifida, except perhaps later in the pregnancy and in utero, which wouldn’t cure the problem, but would perhaps treat some of the heart, nerve and other organ defects. The reason obstetricians and family doctors offer this treatment so early is to give the parents a chance to abort.

Isn’t it strange, that in this post-Nazi, post-World War II age, in times when we have equal opportunity employers, disability benefits, special parking places for people with a disability, the Special Olympics and the Paralympics, that 90% of children with Down syndrome are aborted? Our modern, tolerant society that says that people with a disability are gifts to society would rather kill them than allow them to be born. This is a classic example of modern eugenics at work, as well as the consumer society we live in. We need to understand that children are not products to be consumed, items to purchase, the latest “thing” you must have: they are gifts, loaned to us for a short time to bring joy, laughter, simplicity, and wonder to the world.

But why would we want to rid the world of children with Down syndrome? The number of people who know a person with Down syndrome is decreasing, but those of us who know them can attest to their gentleness, sensitivity, friendliness, and their genuine love for other people. Parents of these children say that the whole family learns so much more from this child with a disability than they could ever imagine. A lesson we all need to learn is that those with genetic differences have just as much of a right to experience life, love and happiness as anyone else.

Check out these excellent articles written by Canadian parents of children who have Down Syndrome:
There’s no such thing as the perfect child
Our daughter’s Down syndrome has taken us on a beautiful journey
Adoption of children with Down syndrome is also increasingly popular: A demand for Down’s


Read the comments at the uOttawa Students For Life website.

uOttawa Students For Life: New Year’s Resolution

This post was written for uOttawa Students For Life by uOttawa Students For Life. It does not necessarily represent the views of NCLN.

by Nicole Pachla

Here we are, at the beginning of a new year. Some of us may have made a few resolutions to try to keep throughout the year…
I would like to encourage you to make one more resolution. It does not require a whole lot of time or energy, but it does requires some courage and conviction. It is the resolution of becoming a little more active in the pro-life movement. And by that, I do not mean putting all of your time and energy into the pro-life cause, but rather becoming more involved in little things and situations. For example, if the topic of abortion comes up in conversation, do not be afraid to share your point of view and be ready to defend it. If you have friends who are not pro-life, and again the topic of abortion arises, gently explain to them the ugliness of abortion and why it should never be an option. Please, do not let any opportunity to show the truth of abortion pass you by. We need to make everyone aware of its reality. Abortion happens every day. Just in Canada, approximately THREE HUNDRED (300) babies are killed PER DAY. That is incredible, terrifying, and very sad. So please, lend your voice to the unborn and help us defend them.


Read the comments at the uOttawa Students For Life website.

uOttawa Students For Life: Signs of Life

This post was written for uOttawa Students For Life by uOttawa Students For Life. It does not necessarily represent the views of NCLN.

by Kate Larson

I recently went on a road trip to Saskatoon, crossing into the US at Sault-Ste-Marie, and passing through Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, and North Dakota, before crossing into Manitoba and going on to Saskatchewan. In several of the places I passed through, in both the US and Canada, I saw something that surprised and delighted me. Periodically, at the side of the road and, in one instance, on a billboard, I saw pro-life signs. They said things like “An embryo is a baby too,” “Human life is a gift, protect it” and “Life…a beautiful choice.” The billboard sported a picture of an inquisitive looking baby with the words “I could dream before I was born.” One of the signs was outside of a church, but the others were just there, along the road, where one might usually see signs for tourist attractions, stores or hotels. No one had knocked them down or defaced them; they were just part of the landscape, and that was what struck me most about them.

The aim of the pro-life movement is to work toward making abortion and euthanasia unthinkable. The opposition that students face in getting their pro-life views heard on campus, and the way the media gives scant and often skeptical coverage to pro-life events, could lead one to believe that the pro-life position occupies a miniscule place on the fringes of society. Yet, what is more mainstream than roadside signs? They advertise everything from burgers to candidates to atheism. Some may not be to our liking, and maybe some people feel upset when they see pro-life signs. Others must feel uplifted, as I did. Others still might just ignore the signs because they have seen them a hundred times. My point is not so much the response as the fact that the signs are there. They are part of everyday life and seem to indicate that the pro-life position is more a part of everyday life than we may have been led to believe.


Read the comments at the uOttawa Students For Life website.

uOttawa Students For Life: Why are you pro-life?

This post was written for uOttawa Students For Life by uOttawa Students For Life. It does not necessarily represent the views of NCLN.

by Elizabeth Tanguay

In the federal election debates, no one even so much as mentioned the word “abortion.” And Harper has explicitly said that he will oppose any motion or bill that reopens the abortion debate. However, this does not mean that there is no point in voting pro-life. It is important to ensure the rights of unborn children and the rights of pregnant women are respected and protected in this county. For more information on elections and pro-life issues, see Campaign Life Coalition’s election page.

Live Action recently asked on their Facebook page, “In ten words or less, why are you pro-life?” Here are the highlights of some of the responses they got.  My personal favourite: “As a former fetus, I oppose abortion.”

May we never forget our most humble roots and continue to stand up for the thousands and millions of unborn children, our human brothers and sisters, who lose their lives to abortion.

Remember why you are pro-life. Vote on May 2, 2011.


Read the comments at the uOttawa Students For Life website.