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uOttawa Students For Life: After-Birth Abortion Happening in Canada?

This post was written for uOttawa Students For Life by uOttawa Students For Life. It does not necessarily represent the views of NCLN.

No matter where you stand on abortion, surely we should all be horrified that 491 babies were born alive and left to die between 2000 and 2009 in Canada, as confirmed by Statistics Canada. How can this be happening in our country? Could it be that not granting any protection or assigning any value to preborn children at any point before birth leads to more of the same treatment when they are still vulnerable after birth? (Infants and others in the UK are being subjected to slow death by starvation in an end-of-life regime called the Liverpool Care Pathway. Euthanasia by any other name is just as insidious.)

Motion 312 would have examined the scientific evidence on when human life begins. Don’t forget Stephen Woodworth’s talk at the University of Ottawa on Monday Dec. 3rd.

*Update: Use this email tool to let your MP know we’re on a slippery slide towards infanticide.


Read the comments at the uOttawa Students For Life website.

uOttawa Students For Life: uOSFL Hosts MP Stephen Woodworth: Discussion on Motion 312

This post was written for uOttawa Students For Life by uOttawa Students For Life. It does not necessarily represent the views of NCLN.

Parliament may not want to discuss the hot topic of when life begins, but we do!

Come join us on Monday, December 3rd at 7 PM in Montpetit 202 (125 University Private) to welcome MP Stephen Woodworth to the University of Ottawa for a public lecture and discussion.

For those who may not know, MP Stephen Woodworth’s Motion 312 was recently voted down in Parliament. This motion proposed that the House of Commons establish a committee to examine the scientific evidence as to when human life begins, and to report back as to the human rights implications of its findings.

You can find details of this motion here: http://www.stephenwoodworth.ca/canadas-400-year-old-definition-of-human-being/motion-312This event is hosted by the University of Ottawa Students for Life, your pro-life club on campus. For more information, please see our Facebook event and follow us on Twitter at @uosfl_epvuo.


Read the comments at the uOttawa Students For Life website.

uOttawa Students For Life: Acknowledging Reproductive Loss

This post was written for uOttawa Students For Life by uOttawa Students For Life. It does not necessarily represent the views of NCLN.

Saturday’s workshop by Kathleen Gray of Montreal’s Centre for Reproductive Loss was full of practical insight and wisdom. So many families are affected by losses such as miscarriage, stillbirth, abortion, adoption, SIDS, infertility and sterility, and yet we have so few opportunities to express sympathy for the parents who experience very real grief. We shouldn’t be afraid to acknowledge reproductive loss; in fact, it is critically important for healing. Those interested in learning more about the Healing Process Model © should request a copy of Grieving Reproductive Loss: The Healing Process.

This work of art gracefully represents the sorrow felt by so many. Sculptor Martin Hudáčeka was commissioned by a group of mothers in Slovakia to create The Child Who Was Never Born.


Read the comments at the uOttawa Students For Life website.

uOttawa Students For Life: Coming Up in Ottawa

This post was written for uOttawa Students For Life by uOttawa Students For Life. It does not necessarily represent the views of NCLN.

First Place OPTIONS is holding its 20th Anniversary Dinner & Auction this Friday, October 19th, from 6pm to 10pm. Our club supports this pregnancy resource centre every year through our December baby shower.

Life Canada‘s National Pro-Life Conference is October 25-27 and takes place not in Ottawa but in Toronto.

Kathleen Gray of the Centre for Reproductive Loss will be at Saint Paul University on Saturday, November 3rd in Room 102 (through the main doors, up the stairs, and straight down the hall to your left) for a training session from 9:30-10:30am and Q&A from 10:30-11:30am, regarding the Healing Process Model © for use by counselors, clergy, etc. in acknowledging and compassionately addressing the emotional, spiritual, and psychological distress of individuals and families affected by such loss as miscarriage, stillbirth, abortion, adoption, SIDS, infertility, and sterility.

On the evening of November 3, Action Life has a fundraiser with Brian Lilley called Changing the Culture by Changing Hearts and Minds at St. Maurice Parish (4 Perry Street). Cocktails are at 6:30pm, the lasagna dinner is at 7pm and the cost is $35.

The 40 Days for Life campaign continues until November 4th.

A Rachel’s Vineyard retreat weekend will be held in Ottawa the weekend of November 9-11 to offer non-judgmental post-abortion healing for women and men.

A Wine and Chocolate Tasting Event to benefit Campaign Life Coalition and the Miriam Centre will be held on Sunday, November 18 from 2pm to 5pm at St. Francis Xavier High School (3740 Spratt Road). The event will be hosted by Nick Vandergradt from CFRA and Stephen Woodworth will be the guest speaker.

Also in Toronto rather than Ottawa, the deVeber Institute‘s Annual Dinner and Public Lecture will be on November 22 at 7pm. Margaret Somerville will speak on The Deadly Debate: Physician-Assisted Suicide on Trial at the University of Toronto. Email bioethics@deveber.org for more info and to RSVP for this free event.


Read the comments at the uOttawa Students For Life website.

uOttawa Students For Life: New Abortion Caravan Coming To Ottawa

This post was written for uOttawa Students For Life by uOttawa Students For Life. It does not necessarily represent the views of NCLN.

A week from today, on July 2nd, the Canadian Centre for Bio-Ethical Reform’s New Abortion Caravan will be in Ottawa for the last stage of its cross-country trip. Stephanie Gray and Jonathan Van Maren will be giving a talk from 7:30pm – 9:15pm titled “Abortion: How we will EndtheKilling in our Lifetime” at Greenbelt Baptist Church, 839 Shefford Rd. All are welcome at this event that is sure to be highly informative and inspiring!

Check out this video for a taste of what the New Abortion Caravan has been accomplishing:


Read the comments at the uOttawa Students For Life website.

uOttawa Students For Life: In Ottawa on Saturday, May 5, 2012

This post was written for uOttawa Students For Life by uOttawa Students For Life. It does not necessarily represent the views of NCLN.

Mark your calendars for a day-long conference called The Justice Summit, or better yet register online now. Human trafficking is an affront to human dignity and all too often hidden.

It is estimated that 27 million people are enslaved around the world at any given moment.
80% of the victims of sex trafficking are women, 50% of these are children.
Human trafficking has risen to become the second most profitable crime globally after the drug trade.
Young women have been and continue to be trafficked in Ottawa and forced into sex slavery.
The Justice Summit will feature presentations by international human rights advocates, human trafficking survivors, and activists.


Read the comments at the uOttawa Students For Life website.

uOttawa Students For Life: Cause for Hope

This post was written for uOttawa Students For Life by uOttawa Students For Life. It does not necessarily represent the views of NCLN.

by Kelden Formosa

The tall, angry young man had just screamed “semantic witch” at the young woman at the lectern several rows before him. It seems he didn’t like what she had to say – her argument that abortion kills a human being did not appeal to his pro-choice sensibilities, apparently. You would think that Stephanie Gray, the pro-life debater and executive director of the Canadian Centre for Bio-ethical Reform, might have stumbled, but instead she continued on with her point, taking it all in stride, as the man walked out of the university hall.

The young man was a pro-choice audience member at the abortion debate organized by the University of Ottawa Students for Life and the U of O Med Students for Life this past year. It’s been a few months since the big debate – one which divided our campus and provoked real controversy – but looking back on it now, I think it provides us with some important insights on the future of the continuing public debate on abortion in Canada.

As one of those involved in the organization of the debate (full disclosure), I was quite happy to welcome even the most militant pro-choice activists, including the young man mentioned prior. It is the challenge of pro-life activists to change the hearts and minds of those who disagree with us. Debates, conferences, advertising, writing – pro-life Canadians have done it all, in the hopes that one day human life might be protected from conception unto natural death.

We’ve done it in the face of intense pressure to resign ourselves to the abortion status quo. Our opponents can’t even believe pro-lifers are still around and have even greater difficulty believing that young people and university students could ever be pro-life. For them, the debate ended in 1988, when the Supreme Court allowed for abortion in Canada without any restriction, throughout all nine months of pregnancy. The appalling statistics about abortion in Canada and around the world have barely registered in the consciousness of today’s pro-choice activists: that one in four unborn children will be aborted, including 90% of children prenatally diagnosed with Down’s syndrome, and a higher proportion of female children than male ones, seems quite unimportant to them and most of the mainstream media.

But, like it or not, the debate continues. It continues in families and amongst friends, in classrooms and in churches, and most poignantly, in the hearts and minds of vulnerable women who are faced with an unplanned pregnancy. And this continuation of the debate is the saving grace for the pro-life movement. Because it means that we’re still not comfortable with abortion – that ending the life of an unborn child still strikes us as morally troubling. For pro-lifers, this is cause for hope.

For pro-choicers, this apparently is cause for fear. Before our abortion debate even happened, dozens of major pro-choice activists rejected our club’s invitation to debate. We offered them the opportunity to confront a leading Canadian “anti-choicer” in an open forum, with a neutral moderator. Yet they said no: Dr. Kathryn Treehuba, a U of O professor and abortion provider; Dr. Fraser Fellow, a UWO professor and abortion provider; Joyce Arthur, of the Abortion Rights Coalition of Canada; Sandra Rogers, a U of O professor; Wayne Sumner, a U of T professor; Heather Holland, of Planned Parenthood Ottawa; representatives from Canadians for Choice, Action Canada for Population and Development and the Canadian Federation for Sexual Health – all of them refused to debate abortion.

So our club decided to hold them accountable. We put up controversial posters highlighting their refusal and wrote a letter to the editor of the student newspaper, making the debate invitation open to all comers. Eventually Jovan Morales, of the Atheist Community of the University of Ottawa, stepped up to the plate to represent the pro-choice side. It seemed for a moment that we would have a civil, if less than ideal, dialogue on abortion.

But it was not to be. Radical pro-choice activists, many of whom are associated with the Women’s Resource Centre of the Student Federation, decided to come out to our debate in force. This would have been great – if they were really there to engage in a reasoned debate. Instead, they brought their posters and their slogans and their raucous attitudes and little else. Holding signs that declared, “An egg is not a chicken” and “My Body/My Choice,” these activists heckled Ms. Gray, the pro-life speaker, menaced elderly debate attendees and shouted “bulls***” and “what the f***” in response to many of the points made by Ms. Gray. Particularly atrocious was the sign declaring, “I hope the foetus you ‘save’ is gay.” For the record, I wouldn’t mind at all.

But why were they so rude and disruptive? Why not just win the audience over with the logic and eloquence of the pro-choice message? I submit that their behaviour betrays the weakness of their own position. Perhaps it’s just the philosophy major in me, but “My Body/My Choice” is a far better slogan than logical argument. As Ms. Gray said: sure, I have freedom over my body – I can swing my arm, for example – but that freedom ends when it injures another person, e.g. swinging my arm to punch them in the face. When the right to choose ends the life of another person, we can and must restrict it. Similarly, it’s true that an egg is not a chicken, but a preborn child is not an egg – it is a fully human organism, genetically distinct and having within itself the means of its own continuance. Fallacies like the ones presented lie at the heart of pro-choice argumentation.

Now it is possible to be pro-choice and philosophically consistent: you simply have to believe that it is alright to kill innocent human beings simply for convenience’s sake. In my experience though, pro-choice people are just as kind and compassionate as pro-life ones. Few would adopt such a radical position. Instead, not being trained in critical reasoning and open to legitimate concerns of women facing unplanned pregnancy, many accept pro-choice fallacies to justify what is really the easy position on abortion. Pro-lifers recognize that women in need deserve real support and real options and the preborn deserve the most basic of rights – the right to life.

Strikingly, when Ms. Gray showed pictures of aborted children in her presentation, I detected a palpable sense of unease come over the pro-choice activists. Standing near their seats at back of the room, I heard them mutter “these aren’t real” and “it’s not true.” But sadly the images were – medically accurate filming of real, live abortion procedures. If they can’t bring themselves to accept the truth of what they support, then perhaps they aren’t as committed to pro-choice ideology as they would have you believe. And that, more than anything, is cause for hope.


Read the comments at the uOttawa Students For Life website.