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Kwantlen Protectores Vitae: Pro-Life Students to Take Kwantlen Student Association to Court for Discrimination

This post was written for Kwantlen Protectores Vitae by Kwantlen Protectores Vitae. It does not necessarily represent the views of NCLN.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Pro-Life Students to Take Kwantlen Student Association to Court for Discrimination

LANGLEY, B.C. (December 3 2012) – Protectores Vitae, the pro-life group at Kwantlen Polytechnic University, has announced that it will be taking the Kwantlen Student Association (KSA) to court after the KSA failed to rescind the decision that denied the group the right to exist on campus.

Court documents are expected to be completed and filed the week of December 10-14. These documents will be made available on the club’s website after having been filed at court.

“After discussion amongst Protectores Vitae members, we have decided to move forward with the lawsuit,” said Oliver Capko, president of the pro-life student group. “It is unfortunate that we have to sue our own student representatives in order to secure equal and fair treatment on campus.”

Legal representation for the Kwantlen Student Association did bring forward an offer to grant Protectores Vitae status as a “recognized group” but not campus club status on par with 33 other clubs. Recognized group status is granted to religious and political party groups, or those that exist to support a specific external organization. Clubs, on the other hand, can be academic, athletic, social, cultural “or other purpose that seeks to enrich the extracurricular lives of students through their time at Kwantlen University,” according to the KSA Clubs Package.

“We are an autonomous group, without affiliation to any other external organization,” stated Oliver Capko. “We are not religious, nor are we political. Our activities would lead to consideration of bio-ethical issues at Kwantlen, which would surely enrich the extracurricular experience of students. That is why we applied for club status and not for recognized group status.”

“Student unions need to recognize and fund all student groups, or none of them. The student union politicians have no legal authority to fund only groups that they like and agree with, while denying funding to groups they disagree with,” stated Oliver Capko’s lawyer, John Carpay.

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For media requests, please contact:
John Carpay, President, Justice Centre for Constitutional Freedoms, 403-619-8014 or jcarpay@jccf.ca

Anastasia Pearse, Western Campus Coordinator of the National Campus Life Network, westerncanada@ncln.ca, 604 365 3484

Oliver Capko, President Protectores Vitae, kwantlenprotectoresvitae@hotmail.com,

Read the comments at the Kwantlen Protectores Vitae website.

Support Free Speech at Kwantlen

From the website of Protectores Vitae:

If you would like to express your support for Protectores Vitae, you can write to the Executive of the Kwantlen Student Association. (Please keep emails civil. Thank you.)

Director of External Affairs: Arzo Ansary — external@kusa.ca
Director of Student Services: Cristopher Girodat – services@kusa.ca
Director of Student Life: Amrit Mahil — studentlife@kusa.ca
Director of Finance: Tony Chiao — finance@kusa.ca

 

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Press Release: B.C. Pro-Life Student Group Denied Right to Exist on their University Campus

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Kwantlen Pro-Life Student Group Denied Right to Exist on their University Campus

LANGLEY, B.C. (November 27 2012) – Students at Kwantlen Polytechnic University have obtained legal representation to fight a recent rejection by the student union of their application to form a pro-life club on campus.

The Kwantlen Student Association (KSA), which represents the students from the university’s four Vancouver Metro area campuses, explained its decision by stating that the creation of the Protectores Vitae club “is clearly against our own standing policy on Abortion and a Woman’s Right to Choose.”

“We’re very disappointed,” said Oliver Capko, president of the pro-life group. “Our student association is supposed to represent us and not censor us for having a different position.”

“They are in violation of their own policies,” stated Anastasia Pearse, the Western Campus Coordinator for National Campus Life Network, an organization which supports pro-life students across Canada. “Their own policy states that the association can’t censor or interfere with a club, even if it disagrees with its beliefs. Free speech and debate, even on controversial issues, should not be stifled at a university simply because those in positions of authority are pro-choice.”

It also appears that the association may have made amendments on October 26 to Article 2 of its Club Procedures Policy in an attempt to create a stronger basis for denying status. The changes significantly increased the ways in which the student association could justify the denial of club recognition.

The club is demanding that the Kwantlen Student Association grant them status. The Justice Centre for Constitutional Freedoms (JCCF) has taken the case and is acting on behalf of Protectores Vitae.

“We sincerely hope that it will not be necessary for Mr. Capko and other students to sue the KSA,” said John Carpay, lawyer and President of the JCCF. “The student union has no legal authority to impose its own views about a moral or political issue on all students by denying club status to students who disagree with the student union. The student union has an obligation to treat all students equally and fairly, without denying the right of students to freely associate on the Kwantlen campus and form the clubs of their own choosing.”

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For media requests, please contact:

Oliver Capko, President Protectores Vitae, kwanlenprotectoresvitae@hotmail.com, 604-772-1156

John Carpay, President, Justice Centre for Constitutional Freedoms, 403-619-8014 or jcarpay@jccf.ca

 

Further details can be found on the club’s website.  

To support free speech at Kwantlen, click here.

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Kwantlen Protectores Vitae: Press Release: Kwantlen Pro-Life Student Group Denied Right to Exist on their University Campus

This post was written for Kwantlen Protectores Vitae by Kwantlen Protectores Vitae. It does not necessarily represent the views of NCLN.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Kwantlen Pro-Life Student Group Denied Right to Exist on their University Campus

LANGLEY, B.C. (November 27 2012) – Students at Kwantlen Polytechnic University have obtained legal representation to fight a recent rejection by the student union of their application to form a pro-life club on campus.

The Kwantlen Student Association (KSA), which represents the students from the university’s four Vancouver Metro area campuses, explained its decision by stating that the creation of the Protectores Vitae club “is clearly against our own standing policy on Abortion and a Woman’s Right to Choose.”

“We’re very disappointed,” said Oliver Capko, president of the pro-life group. “Our student association is supposed to represent us and not censor us for having a different position.”

“They are in violation of their own policies,” stated Anastasia Pearse, the Western Campus Coordinator for National Campus Life Network, an organization which supports pro-life students across Canada. “Their own policy states that the association can’t censor or interfere with a club, even if it disagrees with its beliefs. Free speech and debate, even on controversial issues, should not be stifled at a university simply because those in positions of authority are pro-choice.”

It also appears that the association may have made amendments on October 26 to Article 2 of its Club Procedures Policy in an attempt to create a stronger basis for denying status. The changes significantly increased the ways in which the student association could justify the denial of club recognition.

The club is demanding that the Kwantlen Student Association grant them status. The Justice Centre for Constitutional Freedoms (JCCF) has taken the case and is acting on behalf of Protectores Vitae.

“We sincerely hope that it will not be necessary for Mr. Capko and other students to sue the KSA,” said John Carpay, lawyer and President of the JCCF. “The student union has no legal authority to impose its own views about a moral or political issue on all students by denying club status to students who disagree with the student union. The student union has an obligation to treat all students equally and fairly, without denying the right of students to freely associate on the Kwantlen campus and form the clubs of their own choosing.”

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For media requests, please contact:

Oliver Capko, President Protectores Vitae, kwantlenprotectoresvitae@hotmail.com, 604-772-1156

Anastasia Pearse, Western Campus Coordinator of the National Campus Life Network, westerncanada@ncln.ca, 604-365-3484

John Carpay, President, Justice Centre for Constitutional Freedoms, 403-619-8014 or jcarpay@jccf.ca

 

Read the comments at the Kwantlen Protectores Vitae website.

Meanwhile, across the pond…

…is a new organization called the Alliance of Pro-Life Students (APS).  Their mission is to “build university communities in England, Scotland and Wales that have a lasting and profound respect for human life from fertilisation to natural death.”

More pro-life societies (i.e. clubs) have been popping up on the universities within the UK and the Alliance of Pro-Life Students, formed by current and former students leaders from a number of these societies, will be:

Building pro-life societies by encouraging students of all religious backgrounds and none to start their own societies.

Supporting pro-life societies by: providing educational resource packs and databases of speakers and reliable sources; helping with event organisation and networking; standing up for the rights of pro-life students to peacefully speak out on life ethics.

Connecting pro-life students: with each other online through our website forum and face-to-face with specialist training days; with other pro-life organisations for internships and volunteering opportunities.

 APS’ first launch event is only ONE WEEK AWAY and we are wishing them all the best as they work to build, support, and connect pro-life post-secondary students in their nation.

Rebecca (on left) and Eve Farren of the Alliance of Pro-Life Students during their meeting this summer.

Our Central Office had the pleasure of meeting with Eve Farren, APS’ Executive Director, this summer (see photo below).  We have since enjoyed staying in touch to talk strategy and share ideas.  And, although many differences exist between the UK and Canada, we found we share a lot in common, including facing similar obstacles on campus.  We look forward to staying in contact and continuing to build this international relationship.  We may be separated by an ocean, but we are united in the cause to bring the pro-life message to the environment that needs it most: university campuses. Find APS on Facebook. 

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National Campus Life Network joins in declaration of support for Motion 312

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

National Campus Life Network joins in declaration of support for Motion 312

September 19, 2012

Toronto, ON – Dozens of Canadian organizations and individuals, including National Campus Life Network (NCLN), have united to sign a Declaration of Support for Parliamentary Study of Canada’s Legal Definition of “Human Being”.

This Declaration affirms support for Motion 312 and the establishment of a special committee to review the definition of ‘human being’ in subsection 223 (1) of the Criminal Code of Canada. Currently the Criminal Code defines a child as a human being only “when it has completely proceeded, in a living state, from the body of its mother.”

“All one has to do is open an embryology textbook to see that the current law simply doesn’t fit the facts,” states Rebecca Richmond, NCLN’s Executive Director. “An examination of current medical knowledge on the subject by Parliament is long overdue.”

The Declaration states, “The current definition was first enacted in Canada in 1892, founded in concepts argued before the courts and the Parliament of England more than three centuries prior, and does not reflect the medical and scientific knowledge acquired over the last century. Given the high value human life is given in our society, as reflected in our social policies and Criminal Code, it is essential that the Parliament of Canada provide clarity in the law on this point which impacts parental choice, biomedical research, medical practice and matters being brought before the courts of the nation.”

The second hour of debate on Motion 312 will take place this Friday. NCLN urges Canadians to voice their support for this motion by contacting their MPs.

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The full declaration can be found here.

National Campus Life Network exists to educate, network and support pro-life post-secondary students across Canada. For media inquiries, please contact Rebecca Richmond, Executive Director, at director@ncln.ca or 416 483 7869.

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Symposium Stories: 2011

We asked a few students from last year’s Symposium to share their thoughts with us on their experiences.

 

Matthew Cram, University of Toronto Students for Life

I thought the Symposium was absolutely fantastic.  It was a great opportunity to great way to brush up on the issues, see some inspiring speakers and get new ideas for events to take back to our campuses – ideas that would never have  otherwise occurred to me. The Symposium offered helpful advice and invaluable support for everything from complex apologetic to the basics of how to strike up a conversation in a crowd.  But I think that the thing I enjoyed most about the symposium was the opportunity to meet other people with their new fresh perspectives on the fight for life. So often on campuses we feel as if we are in the extreme minority and that is why it was such a great experience to see that people just like me from all over the country, each with something new to bring to the discussion, whether it was a new idea for an event or a new take on an argument.  The symposium helped me make great connections to other pro life clubs across the country and helped me make a whole lot of new friends as well. I would highly recommend it for anyone who wants advice on how to take the pro life message to their campus.

Erin Murphy, Brock Students for Life

I’ve been Pro-Life my whole life, knowing that abortion was not the answer to any problem. But it wasn’t until I attended the Symposium that I truly became Pro-Life. It was then when I heard, “If you actually believe that abortion is murder, how should you act?”. It was then that it clicked. I couldn’t be Pro-Life and stand by the sidelines anymore. I had to stand up, get the courage and fight for the innocent babies being murdered.

I highly recommend attending this Symposium. It helped give me the courage and skills I need to raise awareness about the genocide taking place in my own backyard.

Rebecca Groen, University of the Fraser Valley Life Link

Attending NCLN’s National Symposium was such a rewarding experience for me. Not only did I get to meet university students from across Canada who were also excited for the pro-life movement, I also gained valuable training from the many speakers that spent time with us that weekend. I established contacts from around my area, and together we  collaborated for Life Week! NCLN made sure we didn’t go home empty-handed, either. They had many resources available for us to take home to get our club started. I am thankful for Abbotsford Right to Life who provided us with funding to be able to participate in this event. 

James Vanderhorst, University of the Fraser Valley Life Link

This symposium was a crash course in how to be a pro-life advocate. It will equip you to do pro-life work and will leave you with a passion to defend the unborn. You’ll meet some great people and you’ll learn some great things.

 

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Saving Babies on Campus

By Amber Miller

Amber Miller works for the Canadian Centre for Bio-Ethical ReformThis post was originally published by CCBR at unmaskingchoice.ca.  It has been posted here with the permission of CCBR.

Before I understood and appreciated the eminence of having a vision, my days of “pro-life activism” were spent organizing meetings for my high school’s pro-life club. At the time, I considered myself to be a kind of pro-life “leader” in my school. This, of course, was before a speaker asked me: “What do we wish to accomplish as pro-life club?” And: “Were our projects bringing us closer to our goal?” Overwhelmed and embarrassed, I realized that I had spent four years doing projects that I didn’t even know were effective. In addition, I failed to inspire the other students because I didn’t see how I could make a difference outside the tiny parameters of the club I founded.

After graduating from high school, I joined McMaster University’s pro-life club, Lifeline. This group definitely had the structure my high school club had lacked, and thus accomplished more. Last February, Lifeline hosted a debate with Stephanie Gray. Watching her present for the first time, I remember being highly impressed with her professionalism and conviction. I wondered what her “club” was like. This summer, I got the exhilarating opportunity to find out. On the New Abortion Caravan, I realized that in order to EndtheKilling of pre-born children, pro-life organizations (and indeed the movement as a whole) need a unified vision for what we hope to accomplish. It is not enough to simply “be” pro-life. Each of us must make the conscious decision to “do” pro-life, and do it well.

As a former student, I understand the difficulties that come with doing part-time pro-life work while focusing on your studies. From scrambling for school supplies to cramming for exams, school in itself is a full time job. Does that mean that you can’t make positive change in the pro-life movement until you graduate or retire? No! It means that, because you’re time is divided, the time you set aside for pro-life work should be spent doing the most effective projects possible. As you get your club organized for the school year, I challenge you to ask yourself:

  • What are our strengths as a club? What are our weaknesses?
  • What are our long-term goals?
  • What short-term projects will help us accomplish these goals? Are they feesable?
  • What other pro-life organizations could we benefit from networking with?
  • What challenges have we faced in the past?
  • How can we invite and keep committed members this year?

One project I would recommend is “Choice” Chain: a relatively inexpensive, simple to execute project that can be taken virtually anywhere. Perhaps, instead of hosting a 2 hour after-school meeting every month, dedicate your lunch hour to doing “Choice” Chain in front of your school. Show those who are most susceptible to the lie of “choice” what abortion really looks like. Sound scary? So is the mass murder of our generation. If these tactics work (which they certainly do), then why not make the most of them for the greatest impact?

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