uOttawa Students For Life: uOSFL adds a video page!

This post was written for uOttawa Students For Life by uOttawa Students For Life. It does not necessarily represent the views of NCLN.

For your viewing pleasure, a video page has been added to the blog. There you can watch several videos, including last fall’s debate entitled “Abortion: A Human Right or a Human Rights Violation?” and a presentation by Andrea Mrozek of ProWomanProLife. Happy viewing!


Read the comments at the uOttawa Students For Life website.

uOttawa Students For Life: uOttawa Students for Life double feature potluck!

This post was written for uOttawa Students For Life by uOttawa Students For Life. It does not necessarily represent the views of NCLN.

So basically this event is what it sounds like: namely, two movies and a potluck supper. The movies we will be showing are Horton Hears a Who! at 5 p.m. and Amazing Grace at 7 p.m. Come for one or both! The potluck supper is, I believe, self-explanatory, but please let us know what you plan to bring so that we will know what to expect (you can reach us at uottawastudentsforlife@gmail.com).

The event will take place this Friday, March 11, starting at 5 p.m., in BRS 314 (this is in the Brooks Residence).

Also we encourage you to bring friends. Bring lots of friends. This event is open to… everyone!!! We want to see lots of new faces. Feel free to also invite students in grades 11 and 12; they are the members and activists of the future!

Hope to see you there!!!

 


Read the comments at the uOttawa Students For Life website.

uOttawa Students For Life: “The Street of the Dead Fetuses”

This post was written for uOttawa Students For Life by uOttawa Students For Life. It does not necessarily represent the views of NCLN.

by Reita S.

Grad school brings a lot of challenges. One of the greatest for me is the encroachment on my free time by conferences, guest lectures, and other school-related activities, which has drastically limited the amount of time I have been able to devote to uOSFL. But, unwilling to fall ‘out of the loop’, I was recently reading through the archives of Pro-Woman Pro-Life. I encourage all readers to follow this blog, as it offers an enlightened feminist persepective on life issues.

One of the great posts I missed linked to the essay “The Street of Dead Fetuses” by William Gairdner. I am not familiar with Mr. Gairdner’s other works, or with his personal philosophies, nor can I speak to their content. But I think that all readers will enjoy this moving approach to the sense of injustice and apathy with which the abortion industry coats the death of children. Please read this excellent piece of writing.

“Aborted fetuses that weigh one pound or less are incinerated. Those weighing over one pound are buried at the city cemetery. He says this. Now you see. It is orderly. It is sensible. The world is not mad. This is still a civilized society.
“There is no more. You turn to leave. Outside on the street, men are talking things over, reassuring each other that the right thing is being done. But just this once, you know it isn’t. You saw, and you know.
“And you know, too, that the Street of the Dead Fetuses will be wherever you go. You are part of its history now, its legend. It has laid claim upon you so that you cannot entirely leave it – not ever.”

 


Read the comments at the uOttawa Students For Life website.

uOttawa Students For Life: The Pain of Abortion

This post was written for uOttawa Students For Life by uOttawa Students For Life. It does not necessarily represent the views of NCLN.

by Kate Larson

If, like me, you were unable to attend the Silent No More event on Feb. 2, I direct you to their website where you can listen to or read stories from women who have regretted their abortions and found healing. The stories are short, but there is a lot of pain in them, pain in the circumstances leading up to the abortions, pain in the procedures themselves, pain in the fear, self-loathing, depression and other negative emotions many women experienced before, during and after the abortions, pain in their regret at the decision, and pain in the healing process. The stories, however, end hopefully. While the regret at choosing abortion does not go away and has led these women to speak out, the stories describe finding forgiveness both from others and from themselves, and experiencing a sense of being set free from the past.

The latter cannot be said of the comparatively few testimonies I have come across from women who apparently do not regret their abortions. They may genuinely feel this way, or genuinely believe they feel this way. They are entitled to their opinion. What strikes me about these stories, however, is how much more negative they are than the stories of regret, despite being considered “positive” experiences of abortion. I don’t just mean negative in the obvious sense of considering that there is nothing regrettable in ending a human life. I mean negative in the sense that they detail all the pain of the stories of regret without the redemption.

Many of the “no regrets” stories describe women being in the same situations and experiencing the same fear, anger, shame, and pressure upon discovering they were pregnant as they do in the stories of regret. Both types of stories describe women having similar reactions during and after their abortions, such as crying, hatred of themselves and those around them, initial relief, and emptiness. The main difference is in how most of the stories conclude. The stories on the Silent No More website end with the admission that, though the hurt caused by abortion never goes away, healing is possible. Many of the so-called “positive” stories of abortion conclude that the author has no regrets because she considers herself undeserving or unfit to be a parent, because she has made and sees herself continuing to make bad decisions, or simply because she did not know of, or wish to know of, any other option at the time. Far from proving that the negative consequences of abortion are either non-existent or inconsequential, the “no regrets” stories show women in pain and as in need of healing as the women of Silent No More. The real difference is that the women of Silent No More have found healing and want to help others begin that long process.


Read the comments at the uOttawa Students For Life website.

uOttawa Students For Life: Silent No More Coming to the University of Ottawa

This post was written for uOttawa Students For Life by uOttawa Students For Life. It does not necessarily represent the views of NCLN.

We are pleased to announce that on Wednesday, February 2, our campus will have the honour of hosting a Silent No More Awareness Gathering. Representatives of the Silent No More Awareness Campaign will be gathering in the University Centre Agora from 10-11 a.m. and again from 3-4 p.m.

Silent No More Awareness seeks to make the public aware of the devastation abortion brings to women and men. The campaign seeks to expose and heal the secrecy and silence surrounding the emotional and physical pain of abortion.

We strongly encourage you to come out and listen to the speakers. The voices of those who regret their abortions need to be heard.

 


Read the comments at the uOttawa Students For Life website.

uOttawa Students For Life: Lessons from the Swiss Experience

This post was written for uOttawa Students For Life by uOttawa Students For Life. It does not necessarily represent the views of NCLN.

by Dante De Luca
Every so often, we at uOSFL invite a speaker to come share with us their experiences in the pro-life movement. Such speakers have included Stephanie Grey, Andrea Mrozek, Vicky Green, MP Maurice Velacott, Dr. Rene Leiva, and many others. There is one man, however, whom we have wanted to have as a speaker but have never been able to get hold of. That man is Dr. José Pereira.

Dr. Pereira is a professor at the University of Ottawa and head of the palliative care program at Bruyère Continuing Care and the Ottawa Hospital. You can read more about him here. And now you can go hear him speak, courtesy of the Ethics in Medicine club.

Dr Pereira will be giving a lecture, entitled Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide: Lessons from the Swiss Experience, on Thursday, January 13, 2011 from 12:30 pm to 1:30 pm in RGN 3248 (Amph D). I encourage you all to go listen to what he has to say since this promises to be an event well worth attending.

 


Read the comments at the uOttawa Students For Life website.

uOttawa Students For Life: Baby Bonanza!

This post was written for uOttawa Students For Life by uOttawa Students For Life. It does not necessarily represent the views of NCLN.

by Katrina Bennett 

It is now December and that means our annual baby shower and Christmas social! We will be collecting items to help First Place Pregnancy Centre, which offers compassionate support and assistance to women facing unplanned pregnancies. The event itself takes place on Saturday, December 4th from 6:30pm to 11:00pm at Café Alt (in the basement of Simard). There will be fun activities, awesome people, and good food.  However, if you aren’t able to come out to the event, you can also drop off your donations at the Clubs Coordinator office, in the UCU room 030A (in the basement of the university centre). Suggested donations: diapers, diaper cream and wipes, maternity wear, baby clothing (especially for winter and for boys), nursing privacy shields and pacifiers.

 Hope to see you there!


Read the comments at the uOttawa Students For Life website.

uOttawa Students For Life: What’s Wrong With an Emotional Response?

This post was written for uOttawa Students For Life by uOttawa Students For Life. It does not necessarily represent the views of NCLN.

by Kate Larson

The October 4th arrest of students at Carleton University about to take part in the Genocide Awareness Project (GAP), the display of graphic posters comparing abortion to the Holocaust and similar atrocities, made me think about the use of images in discussions of abortion. At both this year’s and last year’s abortion debates hosted by Ottawa Students for Life, the pro-choice speakers re-iterated the common argument that the use of images of abortion in discussions of the subject is intellectually dishonest and emotionally manipulative. This implies a number of things: firstly that images are being used in place of logical arguments, rather than to enhance them or to promote discussion of them, secondly that words are somehow neutral and have no manipulative power of their own, and lastly that emotions have no place in just decision-making.

            The National Campus Life Network website is just one place where rational arguments against abortion are laid out clearly and compellingly. No images are used to fill logical holes. There are no holes to fill. As for the OSFL debates, full logical justification of the pro-life position was given. A short video was shown of an abortion being performed, and the audience was warned that it might be disturbing and that they were welcome to cover their eyes or turn away if they wished. The video did not substitute for any argument, but only served to remind the audience, if they chose to view it, of the reality of something that is too horrifying for words to adequately convey.

            This brings us to the emotional resonance of words. Words can be carefully chosen to increase or decrease the emotional impact of what a person is saying. They are certainly not mere servants of fact. One has only to consider how abortion is often referred to in society to see that. Terms such as “a woman’s right to choose” or umbrella terms such as “reproductive rights”, “reproductive freedom”, “reproductive choice”, and “body rights” are not factual references, they are names chosen to make the killing of babies sound positive, desirable, and even necessary. It seems to me there can be no intellectual honesty and lack of emotional manipulation in a position that doesn’t even properly name what it attempts to justify.

            Why do we debate issues such as abortion? We do so because we do not live by logic alone. The desire to make just decisions is motivated not by statistics or cost-benefit analysis but by love and compassion for others and hope that our society will be better for everyone if we do what is right and oppose what is wrong. Logical argument is important, but it is this love and compassion and hope that makes us more than automatons and ought to help ensure that we do not blithely allow innocent human beings to be killed. Of course people will have an emotional response to images of abortion: the images are awful. They are also real and no amount of rhetoric is going to make them seem positive, desirable, or necessary.


Read the comments at the uOttawa Students For Life website.