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uOttawa Students For Life: A Pro-life Hero Passes Away

This post was written for uOttawa Students For Life by uOttawa Students For Life. It does not necessarily represent the views of NCLN.

By Alana Beddoe

On Dec 3rd, pro-life leader Heather Stilwell passed away with her family by her side. Stilwell was recently honoured at the International Pro-life Conference in Ottawa with the Mother Theresa award. At that event she declared, “I will fight abortion until the day I die.”

Heather Stilwell worked as a school trustee for 15 years and was a founding member of the Christian Heritage Party. She also served as the president of the Pro-life Society of BC. Even in her illness, she taught about the value of life and dying with dignity. I have the pleasure of knowing one of Heather’s daughters, who spoke of the wonderful opportunity to hold her hand, pray and listen to music with her in the last few weeks of her life.

More information about Heather Stilwell and the award she received can be found here.


Read the comments at the uOttawa Students For Life website.

uOttawa Students For Life: How to Support Roxanne’s Law

This post was written for uOttawa Students For Life by uOttawa Students For Life. It does not necessarily represent the views of NCLN.

A vote on Roxanne’s Law will be held on Wednesday, December 15, in the House of Commons. The goal of Bill C-510 is to provide legal protection for women who are being coerced into having an unwanted abortion. There are a few things we can do to show our support for this worthy initiative. First, write to your MP to let him or her know that you support the bill. You can use sample letters or print off and mail in a postcard. Next, sign the online petition. And then make a video! Click here for straightforward guidelines and see the sample above for inspiration. (The project is led by a religious group but all are invited to participate.) Don’t delay in showing your support!


Read the comments at the uOttawa Students For Life website.

Roxanne’s Law (Bill C-510) Update

By Garnet Van Popta

Garnet Van Popta is an alumnus of uOttawa Students For Life and a guest blogger for NCLN.  He is currently studying at Humber College.
N.B.  The views expressed by guest bloggers do not necessarily represent the views of NCLN.

A debate on Bill C-510 is scheduled for Monday’s (November 1st) session of Parliament. A vote on the bill is scheduled for December. Bill C-510, also called Roxanne’s Law, is a private member’s bill introduced by Rod Bruinooge, an MP from Winnipeg.

Essentially, the proposed amendment to the Criminal Code would criminalize the act of coercing a woman to have an abortion against her will. Under this law, a pregnant woman could press charges against a boyfriend, parent or someone else who attempts to coerce her into having an abortion. There is an exception for physicians who might counsel a woman to have an abortion to protect her life.

For the full text of the bill, click here.
This bill has proven to be controversial, even among pro-life people.  Some say it’s useless; some say it’s not enough. The fact is, however, that this bill may save the lives of unborn children, and may prevent a woman from having an abortion against her will. It may have saved Roxanne Fernando’s life.
We need to get educated about this bill, and support it. Start a letter-writing campaign. Attend the parliamentary debate (this might be easier for clubs in the Nation’s Capital). Spread awareness on your campus. As MP Bruinooge says in the video, the only way this bill will pass is if the people of Canada speak out about the value of human life.
For more information, check out www.RoxannesLaw.ca.


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uOttawa Students For Life: Baffling Reproductive Policy

This post was written for uOttawa Students For Life by uOttawa Students For Life. It does not necessarily represent the views of NCLN.

by Marissa Poisson

As was announced in July, free infertility treatment will be available in Quebec starting this month, which leads one to believe that infertility is now considered a disease there. Paradoxically, pregnancy also seems to be classified as a disease in the province and throughout the country given the availability of publicly funded abortion. Are the definitions of any other diseases wholly dependent on the circumstances of the individuals they afflict?

As a young woman, am I to believe that if I were to become pregnant now, when it would interfere with my university studies, the sensible choice would be abortion and that if I were to find myself unable to start a family in twenty years, it would be reasonable to expect free IVF?

The incoherence is jarring. Quebec’s politicians stand behind aborting tens of thousands of future Francophones every year yet are poised to spend lavishly to enable women to try their luck at conceiving artificially. Adoption seems to be the forgotten component in this equation; it needs to be encouraged as a viable option for women facing unplanned pregnancies and infertile couples. In the multi-million dollar business of life and death, the cures are worse than the diseases.


Read the comments at the uOttawa Students For Life website.